Category Archives: Historical Writing

Student fears

After participating in the #AdvanceSELinCA activities this summer, I decided to start the year with a focus on trauma and recovery.

The first step was asking my students two questions. Here is a sample of their responses.

What is one thing that you are most afraid of this school year?

I’m not that good at online anything so I am afraid that I will mess up on some assignments because I don’t know how to do them properly. 

I suck with online school.

I’m sorta afraid of waking up super super late and completely missing almost all of my zooms for that day.

Not knowing how to do the work because of online classes.

I am scared of not being able to understand/learn much with online learning.

One thing I am afraid of this school year is messing up or not knowing how to do my assignments.

One thing I am afraid of for this school year is that I won’t be able to figure out how to submit certain things because I am new to using schoology. 

This school year I am afraid I will fall behind in school work and become overwhelmed.

One thing I’m afraid of is not knowing how to do things in online school because I’m not very good with technology.

I am afraid of not learning the same online as I did in person.

I’m afraid my internet won’t work and I won’t be able to join a class.

I’m afraid of not being able to understand the material as much because online learning is very different than in person. 

I’m afraid that I’ll be behind my school work and not know what’s going on during my classes.

One thing I am scared of this school year is missing zoom meetings.

I’m afraid that I’m going to fall behind on schoolwork.

I am scared that I’ll miss a class and just miss an important lesson.

I’m afraid of not being able to retain information from online work and classes.

I am afraid I will procrastinate too much and fall behind in all my work.

I’m afraid of being late to class due to the fact that my sleeping schedule is messed up.

I am afraid of missing assignments and zooms because I couldn’t find or access the materials. 

a few things i’m afraid of for this school year are procrastinating and not actually learning.

I’m scared of accidentally missing assignments or zoom meetings, like if I forget to check one subject or platform. 

I’m scared that I’m gonna keep getting distracted and have a hard time learning.

Some things that I am afraid of are getting distracted and falling behind. I like to wait until the last minute to do things and I get distracted easily. working from home isn’t going to make that any easier.

I’m afraid of not understanding a topic and messing up the homework.

One thing I’m afraid for this school year is that we won’t go back.

I am afraid that I will get distracted and will fall behind.

I am afraid that I won’t be able to attend the zoom meeting due to internet issues.

One thing that I am afraid of this school year is having online school next year because I don’t learn as well when on remote learning. I am also afraid of procrastinating.

I am afraid that I will miss a class or be really late and miss everything and not understand the lesson well then doing bad on the test. 

The main thing I am afraid of this school year is falling behind and missing assignments. 

My biggest fear for this school year is failing or procrastinating a lot more than usual

I’m scared that I can’t handle all the classes I signed up for and can’t keep up like I thought I would.

My biggest fear for this school year is getting overwhelmed with the work given to me.

One thing I’m afraid of is that I’ll get piled with so much work that i won’t know how to get back on track or what to complete first. 

My biggest fear is failing my classes and AP tests.

The one thing I’m most afraid for the school year is failing the classes because online is different that in person

One thing that I’m afraid of this school year is falling behind or feeling too overwhelmed with class work getting pushed all into one hour.

My biggest fear for this school year is falling behind classes and not going back to school until next year. 

Failing my classes 

What should your teachers do to manage your concerns about online learning?

Teachers should offer more practice to learn instead of giving busy work for a letter grade.

Provide extra support for homework, and have patience as all of us are new to online learning.

Teachers should communicate with other teachers to not overlap work dates and just overall spread out due dates. 

To manage concerns about online schools our teachers should have all assignments and due dates placed somewhere clear to see so that there is no confusion.

I feel like teachers should be understanding and try not to give so much work as to stress the students out too much considering we are all going through a stressful time right now. Also extra credit since people will be missing out on alot.

I feel like teachers should help and understand when there are technical issues with zoom when it’s needed. I feel like students get these feelings because they are exploring a new way of school and are so unaccustomed to being there in the classroom.

Be available during school hours to help student who may have extra questions 

Teachers should motivate us and understand that this a whole unique way of learning. 

Teachers should be more patient and offer substitute assignments to help understand harder concepts

Teachers can help manage concerns by answering questions and communicating with us.

Teachers should address the concerns that the students have and provide simple solutions for said problems. This will help guide students through these concerns with less anxiety; another thing that the teacher may do to help students is being open to discussion about these problems and working with students to overcome them. 

Send reminders for students to remember what’s coming up, if it’s either assignments or important dates.

Teachers should try to use similar websites so that us students will have an easier time finding things and feel more organized without being swarmed with tabs.

Teachers should offer more ways on how to help on hw

I feel that we should be given more creative ways to learn instead of just straight out of the book.

Teachers should find alternatives to schoology, for instance if schoology crashes, having a backup plan would be helpful. 

I think teachers should try to be more understanding and have patience because online learning is all new to us. We’re all kinda stressed out so I think we’d appreciate it if teachers don’t pile a ton of work on us just because we’re learning from home.

Teachers should be patient with us one of my teachers already has stuff for us to print out and my printers at target

Teachers should make sure all students are aware of deadlines. It would be helpful to have some sort of schedule posted as well as organized materials in either Schoology or Google Classroom. 🙂 

Teachers should just take their time with their lessons and take time with learning this new process.

I was most scared of showing my face on camera. I feel like if it wasn’t forced then it wouldn’t be so bad I guess. But it’s not that bad.

I think that teachers should concentrate more on posting lessons and lectures rather than giving out busywork. I also think it would be helpful to keep the zoom meetings for more of a discussion rather than teaching lessons on zoom because something student’s internet cuts out. 

Teachers should record lessons and post them in case we need them, like they do in colleges. Also to be patient and understanding. 

I think that teachers should answer as soon as possible, as well as understand that this is a whole new learning environment for us. 

I think patience is key, since we’re all new to online learning. I also think we shouldn’t just rely on Zoom meetings, and find other ways to learn and practice, such as being recommended online articles, or having worksheets.

Teachers should offer after school help and should take this time to go more in depth with assignments instead of just giving us extra work.

6 Tips for #DistanceLearning

Always a pleasure to work with Dr. Michelle Herczog at the Los Angeles County Office of Education to provide 6 Tips for Distance Learning. Here is a link to the webinar. I have pasted the agenda with additional links below.

Objective: Teachers will learn to simplify distance learning lessons and create engaging digital learning experiences. Presentation link: https://bit.ly/DL6Tips 

  1. Collaborate to Create Cross-Curricular Experiences
    1. Hiroshima Reading
    2. Cold War
    3. World History through Literature List
  2. Increase Engagement with Student Choice
    1. Choice Boards & HyperDocs
    2. Civil Rights Leaders
  3. Provide Feedback that Increases Engagement
    1. Learning from Distance Learning
    2. Culminating Task
    3. Feedback from History POV & ELA POV
    4. Weekly feedback
    5. Commonlit Written Response Rubric
  4. Emphasize Executive Function in the Learning Process
    1. Student Reflections on Time Management
    2. Goal-Plan-Do Review
    3. Exam Wrappers
  5. Focus on Familiar Learning Apps & Technology
    1. Listenwise
    2. Commonlit
    3. Playposit/Edpuzzle
    4. Flipgrid
  6. Extend Your Influence Beyond the Classroom
    1. Arist Text Messaging Platform
    2. 7 Day Cold War Class 
    3. Student Testimonials

Student Created Study Guides

As a teacher who emphasizes reading and historical literacy to my high school students, I have mixed feelings on using study guides. Do they help our students read the texts we assign them? Are they used only by students who haven’t done the reading, but want to project the illusion of work? History teachers can solve this problem by asking students to create their own study guides focused on what happens to the historical figures, which vocabulary words a reader might have trouble with, and illustrating timelines that help the reader get a better understanding of the story.

Hellfighters

These students had five days of class time to read a graphic novel called The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks and illustrated by Caanan White. I have used this text several times in my World War One unit and have noticed that students have trouble tracking who is who and who does what throughout the story.

This post is to showcase some exemplars from this assignment. I have also included the reflections from each student describing how they managed their time in italics. There was a 70% completion rate on this assignment. Grades were distributed as: 42 As, 48 Bs, 22 C/Ds, and 40 students didn’t turn in anything. Students receiving an A generally had 10 or more character descriptions, suggested WWI vocabulary words, or events on their timelines.

The first day in class, I spent the day trying to figure out what the prompt was and I was planning out how I was going to organize my information. The following days I read the book and wrote my information as I was reading. I also found a pdf of the book online which allowed me to work on the project at home. One of the major issues I have is that I get distracted easily when people are talking while I’m reading, so that’s why I also had to work on it at home. I think if I didn’t get so distracted, I would’ve finished sooner. In total, I would say I spent about 1.5-2 hours doing the assignment.

I think I earned an A because I worked hard on my slides and looked for characters and searched for different WW1 timelines. I probably would have made my vocab and WW1 facts more detailed.

This next student created a seven page book. I was impressed how historical context and vocabulary were front-loaded. There was also a very consistent citation method employed, no doubt due to this students concurrent enrollment in AP Research.


I believe that if I spent more time on identifying the characters and explaining the timeline it could have performed better. I worked all days, however, I definitely forgot to work on the Commonlit after being too focused on the study guide.

Another project that got an A was this unique creation on Canva. This student had turned in some work on paper and I did not check her electronic work. When you see her comment below, you will understand why she came to me after school very quickly so I would change her grade. She was proud of her project and I love students who advocate for themselves.

Hellfighters Study Guide

I GOT AN A! I really think i got an A because I really put the effort on the presentation of the time line. The only thing I would say is the amount of information I used could’ve been more but other than that I cited, used pictures, used more information than ____. This is very honest btw.

Overall, I was very pleased with how creative my students were in response to this assignment. There were a few instances of shared images and text, which necessitated some classroom discussion on plagiarism. I can see repeating this assignment next month when we read …

Maus

My next post will delve into the reasons that 40 students did not turn in anything at all. This semester we will be doing a lot more work reflecting on our classwork and documenting how students manage their time.  #FailureIsNotanOption

Numbers Mania Instructional Sequence

This post will describe an instructional sequence using the Numbers Mania EduProtocol, a corroboration activity, and a rhyming game to formatively assess student’s knowledge of the French Revolution. Numbers Mania is a lesson frame from Marlena Hebern and Jon Corripo’s book The EduProtocol Field Guide: Book Two where students create an infographic to demonstrate their knowledge of your subject. 

French Revolution by the Numbers

In this case, students used numbers to tell the story of a historical event. I use this lesson frame to motivate students into reading the textbook more closely than they would if they were just taking notes.  

French Revolution by the Numbers (1)

Here they are specifically looking for numbers that can be pulled from the text and used to tell the beginning, middle and end of the French Revolution. 

French Revolution by the Numbers (2)

For this assignment, my students had one class period to pull numbers from their textbook in order to tell the story of the French Revolution. This explains the lack of variation in their infographics. You can see an entire class period of Numbers Mania infographics HERE. On average my students created five stats for their story in one class period. There was a high of ten numbers and a low of 1 in the sample.

In the past, I have extended this activity by adding an annotated bibliography assignment. To evaluate the efforts of my students, I “graded” them on the number of statistics they included and the number of sources they used. Thanks to Ryan O’Donnell aka @creativeedtech for giving me access to his great templates

Corroboration

On the second day of this unit, students were given a lengthy Sparknotes reading on the French Revolution and asked to corroborate facts from that reading with events in their textbook. 

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I ask my students look for areas of agreement in two separate texts. They document them in a Fact 1, Fact 2, Implication format. This helps high school students learn to analyze texts critically and to improve their explanations of quotes they select as textual evidence.

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In one class period, my students could identify a low of two corroborations to a high of 16 corroborations of varying quality. The class average was five.

Rhyming Couplets

On the third day of this unit, students were asked to retell the story of the French Revolution in rhyme. They were allowed to work in groups or as individuals. Twenty-nine poems were created in two class periods. 

French Revolution in Rhyme

I have removed student last names in order to publish the poems. At this point, I can turn them over to my ELA teacher colleagues and they will follow up with helping the students review their rhyme scheme, improve their drafts, and polish their prose. Interestingly, when I asked students which activity they felt them learn the most about the French Revolution (numbers, corroborating, or rhyming) — they overwhelmingly chose the rhyming activity. It helped them remember more historical details.

Conclusion

The EduProtocols book series has helped my transition to a 1:1 classroom by making the learning in my classroom visible. This allows me to give students discrete skill builders that I can remix for coherence and consistency. This has helped me get off the lecture and test treadmill. What protocols or skill builders are you using in your classroom to help students demonstrate they understand the content you are teachng them?  

Mix Iron Chef Into Reading and Writing

Students in my 11th grade US History class typically read four non-fiction books in addition to their History textbook. I have noticed that their note-taking skills, attention to detail, and recall of historical figures in the text need to improve. As students advance through upper-division work text complexity increases, yet the amount of reading instruction decreases. This can result in real problems in college where professors expect their students to do three hours of reading in the subject-area for every hour they spend in class. This post will describe an instructional sequence that helps students focus on the historical characters in a nonfiction reading using an Iron Chef protocol, a Who Am I? narrative writing technique, and a video response system that improves student speaking and listening skills.

Iron Chef

Eduprotocol authors Marlena Hebern and Jon Corippo developed this tool to help students flex quick research reps in 15 minutes or less. For this pre-reading activity, I listed the historical figures in The Professor and the Madman and assigned them via number on my class roster. Students research the individual, note key details and page number(s) they appeared on in the book, and for the secret ingredient add what we should know/remember about this person. The slide below is an example of what a student can create in less than one class period. Students build their own study guide that they can refer back to and add to as they read.

Iron Chef Pics

Who Am I? A First Person Protocol

The next step is to have students turn their slide research into a first person narrative. Even if students mostly copied information from Wikipedia into their Iron Chef slide, now they have to do the literary heavy lifting of converting it from the third person into the first person. This student has done an excellent job with a minor historical figure from The Professor and the Madman and has even slipped her own confident personality into her script. I can’t wait to see what she does with her video.

Iron Chef Pics (1)

Flipgrid – Engage Your Students in Speaking and Listening

The last step involves using Flipgrid, a free video-response platform that helps students learn via their own videos. For this assignment, the students have to speak for one minute giving the viewer clues as to the historical figure’s identify. As the grid populates with videos, students can view them, take notes, and learn who is who before they take a quiz made up of ten randomly selected videos.Screenshot 2019-09-21 at 5.17.58 PM

This video shows how students can be creative and have fun when engaged in this instructional sequence. Flipgrid tracks the analytics for each grid, which allowed me to see that my students viewed each others videos a total of 2,764 times prior to the quiz. That adds up to 43 hours of study time on the characters in a book they haven’t read yet. What do you think will happen when they encounter each character in the text?

Big Takeaways

What I like about this instructional sequence is that each day builds on what students created the day before. If they didn’t try very hard with the research they put into their Iron Chef slide, then they will struggle to write a Who Am I? speech. If they didn’t put some effort and creativity into their script, then they will have trouble making an interesting video. If they didn’t review their classmates’ videos, then they probably won’t do very well on the quiz.

Teaching students to show up and work hard every day is the most important work we can do as teachers. I have used this instructional sequence to help my students learn about Historical Eras, Enlightenment Philosophes, and people in the Civil Rights Movement. These activities have increased effort and engagement in my classes. Feel free to remix them for your class and subject matter. All I ask is that you leave a comment or tag me in a tweet @scottmpetri and let me know how they work for you. 

Graphic Novel Review: Illegal

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Illegal is the story of Ebo, a young boy from Ghana who journeys across Africa to Tripoli where he hopes to migrate to Europe and reunite with his older sister Sisi and his older brother Kwame who have already left home. This 122 page graphic novel by was written by Eoin Colfer and Andrew Donkin with the images drawn by Giovanni Rigano.

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A small cast of characters make this book an easy, yet dramatic read for students learning about immigration and Africa. Ebo, Kwame, Sisa, Uncle Patrick, Rozak, Penn, and Cammo.

The reader quickly learns that the life of a migrant is a dangerous routine of work, hide, and sleep in order to get up and avoid detection the next day. Human traffickers abound and pop up frequently to separate migrants from their hard-earned money.

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Ebo’s gift for song carries him to the city of Agadez where an impromptu gig at a wedding helps him get to Europe. There are many opportunities for teachers to help students learn about African countries, the legacies of imperialism, and the sad history of decolonization. Students can create empathy maps, timelines, and map the refugees’ journey, as well as engage in inquiry projects about refugees in and out of the United States.

The opening quote from Eli Wiesel reminds us all that humanity depends on humans caring for each other. Isn’t that what the study of history is for?

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Five Resources for Teaching About Racism

There has been heated debate about how to teach racism and social justice in schools. Part of this rhetoric centers on whether or not white teachers can effectively teach racism and social justice since they have been the beneficiaries of privilege and members of the dominant American culture for hundreds of years. 

I feel that it is the job of a History teacher to inspire curiosity. To do this I pair film and literature in my high school History classes and then let my students create inquiry projects that demonstrate their learning. There are too many facts, figures, events, and readings and too little time to teach civil rights history comprehensively, but good teachers help students make connections between different historical periods and contemplate the type of society they wish to create and participate in.

Following are five resources that I have used to inspire my students to explore the Civil Rights Movement via independent inquiry.

The Best of Enemies directed by Robin Bissell starring Sam Rockwell and Taraji Penda Henson examines a racially-charged charette that takes place in the summer of 1971 in Durham, North Carolina. Without spoiling the ending, there are worthy themes in the treatment of US veterans returning from World War I, World War Two, and Vietnam that deserve student examination through a racial lens. While this movie has been criticized for having a white savior narrative, I found Ms. Henson’s portrayal of the activist Ann Atwater and Babou Ceesay’s performance as Bill Riddick worthy of sharing with my students.

Unexampled Courage by Richard Gergel is a powerful and moving piece of non-fiction that situates the Civil Rights Movement in the Truman administration’s 1948 Executive Order 9981. The blinding of Sgt. Isaac Woodard and the awakening of President Harry S. Truman and Judge J. Waties Waring is a story that deserves a wider audience. There are strong parallels to the treatment of the Harlem Hellfighters after WWI and the Red Summer of 1919 that students should examine via individual inquiry.

I Am Not Your Negro directed by Raoul Peck was nominated for an Academy award for Best Documentary Feature. It’s hard to believe this 2016 film lost the Oscar to OJ – Made In America. The words written by James Baldwin are masterfully woven with contemporary footage of racial unrest from Charlottesville with narration from Samuel L. Jackson that presents the Civil Rights movement through the assassinations of Medgar Evers, Malcom X, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This film made me want to read more of the great work of James Baldwin

Hellhound on His Trail by Hampton Sides takes readers on the FBI manhunt for MLK’s assassin. It is a well-researched and detailed look into the life and inner circle of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as it pivoted from the Civil Rights movement to the Poor People’s March. One of my students declared this was the best book he’d read in his life. I would have a hard time disagreeing with him. Another student continued researching members of Dr. King’s inner circle and was gratified to find that Ralph Abernathy and Hosea Williams remained advocates for the poor and protested against the Apollo 11 mission

Image result for ralph abernathy apollo 11

Lighting the Fires of Freedom by Janet Dewart Bell looks at the contributions of nine unheralded African American women in the Civil Rights Movement. Each chapter is a detailed oral history featuring the type of historical writing all that teachers should be using as models for their students. I found the chapter featuring Medgar Evers’ widow, Myrlie, particularly heart-breaking when she describes visiting the house where her husband was assassinated.

“Today when I visit my former home, which my children and I deeded to Tougaloo College as a museum, I can still see the blood. We needed to get away from that place. Our oldest son, Darrell Kenyatta, reached a point where he refused to eat, he would not study, he would not talk. He went into this very, very angry withdrawal mode. I knew we needed to be away from the house. My daughter would go to bed with her dad’s picture, holding it every night. The youngest one, Van, who was three, would go to bed with this little rifle. I knew that we could no longer live in that house” (p. 201).

Making historical events personal and relevant is the first job of a History teacher. I aspire to help my students see themselves in shaping the future of America. Redressing grievances is part of our Historical DNA. Presenting these resources to your students will help them develop their own understanding of racism, social justice, and the Civil Rights Movement. I hope you will share your work with a supportive community of teachers and together we can help our students move America closer toward the ideals of all men (and women) being created equal.

#CCSS19 and #CUE19

Four different presentations in four days. CUE19 and CCSS19 have been a blur of learning and sharing. My brain is full. More commentary later, but I wanted to get the decks up for conference participants.

Use Genealogy to Engage Students in Historical Inquiry

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1ecbyJBkJAGePF1_mQmHWJd4p6pFMt9_X7h9uartdkm0/edit?usp=sharing

50 Minute Inquiry

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1DyGJI9YItnSdbSMf0ZaF8MOwOa8MYbT70BQnvIIeQOI/edit?usp=sharing

LeRoy’s Big Idea

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1p1_3IEW7SXET2610u0PDEONsBj8YGE2UyRWdcUveuCQ/edit?usp=sharing

CyberSandwich

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1ZjeGTqd1Q7ANksppLlNmyOh9WPVmeu5c3JLtvz57N-o/edit?usp=sharing

Peer Review Reinforces Writing Instruction

For the past few years, I have been experimenting with peer review in my high school History classes. The California Council for the Social Studies recently published my article about this just as I was conducting a peer review activity with my 10th grade World History students. In the article, I detail using a computer program called PeerGrade, which is great, but can add several days to a lesson because students have to type their work, submit it, and then conduct several peer reviews.

This post will showcase some student work in doing a peer review activity on paper in one class period. The essay was an argumentative task where students had to state a position about eugenics and support it with evidence from 15 Minute History and the Eugenics Archive. Before writing the essay, students shared the evidence they had categorized on a Vee Diagram. The peer review worksheet I created can be accessed in this Google Doc.

In two (50 minute) class periods of writing my 10th grade students produced an average of 361 words with 6 explanations of their evidence.

Eugenics - positive or negative

Eugenics - positive or negative (1)

Eugenics - positive or negative (2)

Eugenics - positive or negative (4)

I stole this list from one of my awesome ELA teachers, Mandy Arentoft and will project it when giving students time to practice using transitions in their historical writing. Another great teacher, Keith Hart from Brunswick High School in Maine has a helpful blog post teaching students how to use transitional phrases to present their evidence.

A benefit in using peer review is that I get immediate feedback from my students that tells me who is applying the skills from my mini writing lessons. In this case, I clearly need to go back and re-teach the importance of including a creative title, a complex thesis, and in using transitions. Fortunately, not everyone will need this instruction and I can create more advanced writing lessons for them in my next station rotation activity.  For more information about peer review, please look at this #TeachWriting Twitter archive on the topic. It has a wealth of resources for teachers looking to implement peer review into their classroom writing instruction.

WWI Podcasts

This post will showcase 11th grade US History students’ podcasts on a person, place, or event from the Great War.

WWI Banner

This WWI Podcast assignment was adapted from an NWP article detailing how to conduct a First Person Research Paper  by Cindy Heckenlaible (2008). First students listened to a 15 Minute History lecture to understand why the US joined WWI and then they used the resources provided to brainstorm topics. To see the directions for a previous assignment, look at Vietnam War Narrative. You may listen to three earlier student examples: The Orange Mist Protest Becomes Tragedy, and The Last Moments of Elizabeth Hall.

Decide to work with partners or work solo. Then use this spreadsheet to declare your narrator and story (topic). Each narrative must be at least three minutes for an individual assignment, add 1.5 minutes to your story for each additional person involved in the project. The five components of this project were worth 50 points each.

1) Produce an Annotated Bibliography in MLA format with at least six sources. If a historical detail is not included in your annotation, then you cannot use it in your narrative. 92% of students turned this in on time.

Use the details from your annotated bibliography to write your script. Document the historical details in your story by underlining them and including a (parenthetical citation) immediately after. The theme of your story should be — What is a moment in history that all students should learn about? You may use sound effects and soundscapes, but NO MUSIC!

Tools
BBC Audio http://bbcsfx.acropolis.org.uk/ 
Soundscapes https://city.ambient-mixer.com/

Make sure you study the tips in this presentation as you plan your narrative and 2) use this format to submit your story in writing.  81% of students turned this in on time. 3) Create an Annotated Timeline that includes maps of where your story takes place. 37% of students used their time well enough to complete this on time. 4) Write a 5 question Quizizz to share after your story has been heard by the class. Emphasize the most important historical details in your questions and include facts that you would expect to see in a history book. 74% of students turned this in on time. 5) Submit your narrative recording to get all the points. 44% of students made this deadline. 65% of students were able to complete all components on time.

Debrief/Reflection

Describe how you managed your time and completed each component of this project? Which of the resources provided did you find most helpful? What does this piece reveal about you as a learner? What would you change if you had a chance to do this project over again?

CA USH Standard: 11.4.5: Analyze the political, economic, and social ramifications of World War I on the home front. CCSS: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.